Online course pays off for couples, archdiocese

This course, co-produced by the Archdiocese of Miami and the Archdiocese of Chicago, will be made available beginning this month to any diocese in the U.S. or Latin America that wants to use it to prepare Spanish-speaking couples to receive the sacrament of marriage.

This course, co-produced by the Archdiocese of Miami and the Archdiocese of Chicago, will be made available beginning this month to any diocese in the U.S. or Latin America that wants to use it to prepare Spanish-speaking couples to receive the sacrament of marriage.

Jesuit Father Pedro Llorente, who works at the Center for Ignatian Spirituality in Miami, tapes the segment "Marriage as Sacrament" during the filming of an online marriage preparation course at St. Patrick Church, Miami Beach. The course, co-produced by the Archdiocese of Miami and the Archdiocese of Chicago, will be made available beginning this month to any diocese in the U.S. or Latin America that wants to use it to prepare Spanish-speaking couples to receive the sacrament of marriage.

Jesuit Father Pedro Llorente, who works at the Center for Ignatian Spirituality in Miami, tapes the segment “Marriage as Sacrament” during the filming of an online marriage preparation course at St. Patrick Church, Miami Beach. The course, co-produced by the Archdiocese of Miami and the Archdiocese of Chicago, will be made available beginning this month to any diocese in the U.S. or Latin America that wants to use it to prepare Spanish-speaking couples to receive the sacrament of marriage.

MIAMI | After two years on the job, Lucia Baez Luzondo is stepping down this month as director of the archdiocese’s Family Life office. But she leaves a parting gift: an online course for Spanish-speaking couples who cannot attend a marriage preparation weekend.

Luzondo will be moving back to Orlando for personal reasons: Her husband and partner in ministry, Ricardo Luzondo, has been offered a job there. But she will continue to serve as a consultant to the archdiocese until a new director of family life is appointed.
For the past year or so, engaged couples who do not have the time or work flexibility to attend the two-day Pre Cana course have been able fulfill the requirement online, at their own pace.

Luzondo said about 40 percent of engaged couples already were opting to do so. But the course was not available in Spanish.
So she and her counterpart in the Archdiocese of Chicago took on the challenge — not merely to translate the material, but to film it entirely anew, “with content of Hispanics by Hispanics, completely adapted to Spanish culture,” Luzondo said.

She and her husband worked on translating and adapting the material. They also took part in the filming, which took place in South Florida earlier this year.
The video is divided into 16 segments which cover Catholic teachings on marriage and are aimed at preparing all types of couples: from those marrying for the first time to those blending families in a second marriage to those separated by military service.

At the end, the couples receive a certificate which proves they fulfilled the requirement for marriage preparation in the archdiocese. There are technological safeguards against cheating, and “if they think they can do it in two hours they are very wrong,” Luzondo said.

Original article by: Ana Rodriguez-Soto – Florida Catholic

Source: http://www.miamiarch.org/ip.asp?op=Article_1381613432576